Player Avatar
Gamer - Level 5
Sophomore
Bard

John McGuinness

gamer level 5
3632 xp
followers
2

Use my invite URL to register (this will give me kudos)
http://boardgaming.com/register/?invited_by=crito13
profile badges
Book Lover
Movie Lover
Soccer Fan
Explorer - Level 3
recent achievements
Rated 50 Games
Rated 50 Games
Rate 50 games you have played.
Critic - Level 3
Critic - Level 3
Earn Critic XP to level up by completing Critic Quests!
I Love Playin' Games
I Love Playin' Games
Claim that you have played a game today by clicking the "Played Today!" button on a game page 50 times.
The Bronze Heart
The Bronze Heart
Give 10 Bronze Hearts to games that you like.
Go to the Baseball Highlights: 2045 page
Go to the Pandemic page
Go to the Defenders of the Realm page
Go to the D-Day Dice page
Go to the Call of Cthulhu 6th Edition page
Go to the Diplomacy page
Go to the Elder Sign page
Go to the Codenames page
8
Go to the Cards of Cthulhu page

Cards of Cthulhu

40 out of 45 gamers thought this was helpful

I am a huge fan of HP Lovecraft. I have read almost every thing he wrote. So, when I hear of a game based on his Cthulhu Mythos, I am both very excited and a bit worried. I think this game does a good of incorporating the feel of the impending doom in a simple solo card game.

The basics of the game goes something like this:

1. You choose one of the main characters to play. Each has a unique special ability. Some are better than others, but they all are fun to play.

2. You draw cards from the draw deck. The draw deck is both the timer, you are trying to get to the end, meaning you win, before one of the other conditions happen, which means you lose. The deck is also where the monsters, gates, and minions (all bad) come out and where you get special artifacts (good or bad) and companions (good).

3. You need to place the monsters, gates, and minions on one of the 4 boards – each board is a different Great Old One. If you ever have too many minions on a board, you lose. You can also lose by losing your sanity, which can be lost by allowing monsters to stay on the boards.

4. You defeat monsters and minions by rolling dice equal to or greater than the strengths of the monster or the minion(s).

This is a simple dice rolling, resource management, and card game. The theme is ok, it certainly comes out enough. There is enough tension to make the game play fun and interesting.

9
Go to the Elder Sign page

Elder Sign

56 out of 64 gamers thought this was helpful

I am a huge fan of HP Lovecraft. I have read just about everything he wrote. So, when I hear of a game based on the Cthulhu Mythos, I both want to try it out and hope it is good. This game is very good.

Using a Yahtzee-style dice rolling mechanic, you try to complete a series of adventures to stop a Great One from entering the world and destroying everything and everyone.

While any game with dice has a higher degree of luck involved, this game has many in-game devices to help mitigate that luck. Whether it be the Yahtzee re-rolling, the skills of the character, or the different cards, thus game ultimately is won or lost by your decisions.

5
Go to the Timeline: Americana page
44 out of 52 gamers thought this was helpful

So, as a history teacher, I was very interested in trying this game out and checking to see if it would work in my class. The game is simple to teach / learn, easy to play, and plays many students. The problem, and it is a big problem, was there were too many mistakes. Ended up making my own cards and using the mechanics of the game. This game also gets low marks for replay value. It may be a decent filler, but beyond that, not really worth it.

The new Timeline: Challenge is a much better game. By adding different game play elements, this game is now a very good family game and gamer game.

5
Go to the Timeline: American History page
43 out of 51 gamers thought this was helpful

So, as a history teacher, I was very interested in trying this game out and checking to see if it would work in my class. The game is simple to teach / learn, easy to play, and plays many students. The problem, and it is a big problem, was there were too many mistakes. Ended up making my own cards and using the mechanics of the game. This game also gets low marks for replay value. It may be a decent filler, but beyond that, not really worth it.

The new Timeline: Challenge is a much better game. By adding different game play elements, this game is now a very good family game and gamer game.

9
Go to the D-Day Dice page

D-Day Dice

94 out of 115 gamers thought this was helpful

If you enjoy dice games or solitaire games or wargames, this game is worth putting into your collection.

Using Yahtzee style dice mechanics, you role your dice, choose ones to keep, and then re-roll the others (up to 2 times). Object of the dice is to collect a variety of resources (soldiers, equipment, bravery, specialists, etc) needed to progress up the beach to take out the German battery. The beach gets progressively more difficult as you get closer to your object. This is a “bloody” game that does a good job of recreating the chaos and bravery and slaughter that was D-Day.

I teach high school history and I have used it in my classes. While not a true accurate simulation, the students, who have learned about the facts of D-Day, get a good sense of the day from the game.

It is quick to set up, play, and take down.

10
Go to the Pandemic page

Pandemic

54 out of 64 gamers thought this was helpful

This was my first modern cooperative game I ever bought. I had heard a lot about from reviewers, so I approached it with very high expectations. This game did not disappoint. Played it with my family, who enjoy playing games – but mostly family and party games – and they loved it. Then played it with my brother – who is a big gamer like me – and he loved it. I have played it a bunch since then, mostly solitaire, and I have always had a great time.

I certainly have my favorite roles, but every role brings something unique to the game and I always find myself saying “I wish we had ___, in the game right now” because situations arise that show that each role can be the difference between winning or losing.

9
Go to the Defenders of the Realm page
47 out of 54 gamers thought this was helpful

Have just recently over the past year or so gotten into cooperative games. Have always enjoyed fantasy rpgs. This game fits both those like a glove.

Drawbacks: takes a long time to set up, has a big footprint, and takes a long time to take down.

Strengths: very good components, beautiful map, good amount of roles to choice from, fairly easy to learn, very immersive, can played solitaire with ease.

I would play this game every weekend if I had the time.

10
Go to the Baseball Highlights: 2045 page
41 out of 46 gamers thought this was helpful

I am a big fan of sports games – have played them since the 1970s. This is a unique take on that genre. Even if you are not a fan of sports or baseball, this is a game you should take a look at.

The deck-building aspects are what makes it so fun. Love starting with one of the pre-made teams and then “drafting” players between games.

Object of the game is to score the most runs in a 6 inning game. Each inning consists in each player playing one card. Each card can have one or more of the following features: hits, defense, quick result, running speed. Each card is either a Natural (better at defense), cyborg (better at pitching), or robot (better at hitting).

The only drawback is it takes getting used to the turn sequence which can be a bit confusing at first.

Can a play a seven game series in 30-45 minutes.

4
Go to the Scrabble page

Scrabble

62 out of 87 gamers thought this was helpful

There are better word games out there now. Games with more theme or fun. But, this is still a must have game. Just about everyone knows this game – you get tiles with letters and try to create words. The less common the letter (for example Z), the more points you get. Board has spaces that give you more points – double letter, true word for example.

Major issues for this game, in my opinion, are it gets old after repeated play and it can sometimes be difficult to play the whole board. This second problem is caused because the first word must be played in the center. Many games end up going to the bottom and right.

Great for improving your spelling, a leisurely game, or getting your older parents into gaming (my parents play this every week).

8
Go to the Statis Pro Baseball  page
9 out of 14 gamers thought this was helpful

I have to admit I am a huge sports board game fan. I must own 25 different ones – baseball, football, basketball, soccer, golf, horse racing, etc. The Statis-Pro series of games are some of the better ones out there. The mechanics are simple, the rules can be very simple to intermediate, and the fun of trying to out-do the real-life players and managers is fun. This is not a pitch-by-pitch type of game. This is more of the manager-style game. Because of that, some people may think it is a bit boring. I actually love this style game. I have never really been a fan of the you-as-player sports games. I love OOTP and Football Manager on my computer.

Basically, you choose your team, set your lineups, and play. Set-up can be very quick or you can spend hours looking over and analyzing players. This game may actually be best played solo. Games take about a half-hour. You can play a seven game series in an evening.

What is great about this game is that there are plenty of people who have created player and team cards from history. Just search online and you can download or order (some for free, most have to buy) your favorite teams, players, or seasons from the history of baseball. This way you can have your dream match-ups. There is also another Statis-Pro Baseball game called Statis-Pro Great Teams that comes with ten great teams.

May not be for everyone, but I also go back and play this game.

6
Go to the Risk page

Risk

4 out of 21 gamers thought this was helpful

One of the true classic “wargames” out there. For people used to playing more involved, realistic games, this one can get a bit old. But, a great family game, a great multi-player game, and a great gateway game. Whether you love this game or hate this game, you have to give it its due.

Each player controls a part of the world. By moving pieces you try to control the entire world. Basic, simple mechanics make this a fun afternoon or evening game for the whole family.

10
Go to the Diplomacy page

Diplomacy

143 out of 156 gamers thought this was helpful

I have been playing Diplomacy for over 3 decades. It never gets old. I love the game so much, I watch videos on how to improve my playing whenever I find one. The game is best played by the full 7 (or 8 if you have someone run the game) players. Each of the 7 players takes control of one of the European powers in the early 1900s – England, France, Germany, Italy, Austria-Hungary, Russia, and Turkey – and tries to control specific supply centers. The game is fairly simple to learn, but hard to master. There are only 2 different game pieces – armies and navies. Each piece can move on space each turn (spaces are regions or countries as opposed to hexes) or support another pieces move. Combat is simply one piece moving into the space that an opposing country controls or is also moving in to. No dice are rolled. If I move in and is supported by one other piece, and you move in with no support, I win (2 to 1). Navies can also help armies move across water. All movement is done at the same time by writing down your orders.

The most interesting aspects of the game, and the parts of the game that makes it difficult to master, is that countries can support each and then stab each other in the back. Prior to writing down your orders, there is a diplomacy phase (hence the name) where players can meet (in secret by going to another room or corner) and discuss strategy. Even if you promise to support someone, you do not have to. But, stabbing someone in the back will probably make them a game-long enemy, so choose those very carefully.

Most people who play the game a lot, know that some countries are more difficult to play or have a favorite country and this usually results in a big advantage as serious gamers do spent a lot of time between games researching strategies. But, “bidding” for countries at the beginning at least gives other players a chance to force that person to take a less desirable starting location.

Does not play well with fewer than 4 players, but does play well with 4 to 6 if you cannot get 7.

Overall, one of the most interesting, intriguing “wargames” out there. It is also one of the originals and has withstood the test of times. Plus, there are tons of reviews, game plays, and strategy hints out there. This makes the game one of those truly rare games that are great to play and also fun to research while planning your next game.

7
Go to the Magic: The Gathering page
60 out of 108 gamers thought this was helpful

This is still the game that other ccgs are compared too. The problem is, there are now many games that are better. I give Magic a 7 out of 10, but it could easily be an 8 (or even a 9), and it could easily be a 5 or 6. The game has gotten more and more complex as the years have passed and they create both new cards, themes, and mechanics. It takes a small fortune to keep up with everything or to play with someone who invests time and money into the game. I still play this game on occasion, and I truly enjoy playing it when I do, but it is not my first choice when I play a ccg. If you have never played a ccg before, this one could be a good one to play since it is still the most widely played, but there are easier games out there to learn how to play ccgs and there are better ones out there. Problem is, these are usually hard to find in stores, hard to find opponents, and may not be here next month.

8
Go to the Elder Sign: Omens page
54 out of 78 gamers thought this was helpful

I have to admit, huge fan of HP Lovecraft! I own and play many games based on his works and have read just about everything he has written. As usual, this app does not truly compare to any similar, high quality board games that are out there, but as apps go, this does a very nice job. I play it often and keep it on my Kindle as one of the few games to always hold a spot. This game does a good job of setting a tone or feeling. I truly enjoy playing it. As usual, the benefits of apps over board games are few, but important – great solitaire ability, no true set-up time, always have it on you, can play in no space. If you like HP Lovecraft or the games based on his works, then this is an app you should pick up.

8
Go to the Carcassonne (iOS) page
96 out of 125 gamers thought this was helpful

I have to admit that I don’t always love digital versions of board games – they always leave me wanting more. With small screens and not always clear directions, they can be frustrating. Problem is, it is often very difficult to find opponents where I live. So, I have to play digital games out of necessity. This is one of the games I keep on my Kindle. The problems of a small screen are vastly outweighed by the solitaire capability and the fact that you do not have any set-up time. I can play anytime, anywhere. If you are used to playing the board game, this app is not as good, but it is an excellent substitute for those times you want to play and are away from your home or just can’t find opponents. If you have never played the board game, it is worth picking up. You can get a nice feel for the game for a fraction of the cost. Either way, by having the app, you can practice and increase your skills and increase your enjoyment when you play the board game. In summary, a must have.

10
Go to the Call of Cthulhu 6th Edition page
81 out of 118 gamers thought this was helpful

I have to admit – I am a big HP Lovecraft fan. I have read just about everything he has written. I also am a big horror fan – but lean more toward the less graphic styles, so Cthulhu-style horror intrigues me the most. Have been playing this game since it first came out. Love the fact that you can play with a small number (even just a game master and one player). Also, the themes and stories are very engaging. Best thing, though, is that it takes thinking to “win” more than brute strength. Winning of course is all in the perspective of going crazy as you progress. If you love RPGs and horror and thinking games – THIS IS THE BEST! A must for any serious gamer.

4
Go to the The Big Bang Theory Party Game page
8 out of 17 gamers thought this was helpful

My family plays lots of games together – we also watch a lot of tv and movies together. We love the show and saw the game in a store. This is a fairly standard trivia game based on a specific product (television, film, etc). We played it the correct way a few times, but got bored with the game. We usually just sit around and ask the questions to each other during commercials while we watch the show. Or we take the cards with us when we travel. Even with that, haven’t played it in a while. If you are a big fan of the show, may be worth a look, but other than that, not worth picking up.

4
Go to the UNO page

UNO

6 out of 13 gamers thought this was helpful

My two girls (college and middle school) play this all the time. My wife and I often join in for some great night of gaming. Very easy to learn. Great travel game. Has great replay value – same as any other basic card game. When we do not know what to do, this is one of the first games we reach for. Can be played for a very short time or as a marathon session. This game takes almost no space – which is important for us as we travel by boat often. One complaint is the new cards are not always easy to understand with a quick glance. This game can be played by a wide age range. My wife actually uses this game in her kindergarten class. Every home should have this game!

6
Go to the Apples to Apples page

Apples to Apples

57 out of 78 gamers thought this was helpful

This is, without a doubt, our go to game as a family. My daughter introduced it to us after playing it in her high school English class. If played by the rules and as intended, it is a great game for building vocabulary and having some fun. If played with a twist of comic-timing, it is outright hilarious. My family usually looks for the funniest connection between words, not necessarily the most accurate. We have a lot of explaining how words are associated, which results in a lots of laughter and often soda coming out of ours noses. Lots of replay value, solid components, very easy to learn. Can be played by a wide age range at the same time. We play this at least once a month (and we play a lot of games as a family).

7
Go to the Wits & Wagers page

Wits & Wagers

7 out of 11 gamers thought this was helpful

This is one of my family’s favorite games. It allows us all (2 parents, a college student, and a middle school student) a chance to win – the last time we played my youngest won. The game uses fun trivia questions, all with a number for an answer. Even if you do not have a clue about the answer, you get most of your points from the second phase of placing bets on the answer(s) you think are closest, without going over. In this way, even someone very young without a lot of knowledge can win by making smart guesses. The questions are fun and interesting and you pick up a bit of knowledge by playing. My only complaint is that there is not a lot of questions, and after a long night of playing, you burn through a lot of the cards. Overall, a very worthwhile purchase.

× Visit Your Profile