Add your own Tips, Strategies, & House Rules! Vote for tips that you think are useful.

Tips & Strategies (5)

Filter by: Order by:
Gamer Avatar
4
Gamer - Level 4
Treasure Map
7 of 7 gamers found this helpful
“A Few More Rounds Wouldn't Hurt”

One of the great things about Star Wars: Armada is the wide variety of objectives that come with the game. When setting up their forces a player will choose three objectives that hopefully match his fleet’s strengths.

While players can choose to play with unlimited rounds, this option is really only reserved for players who want to play to the complete destruction of the enemy’s forces (which takes time). Some of the objectives need a timer of sorts, but the 6 rounds that the game gives just seem to short to me especially for those who want a slugfest, but don’t have all day to completely finish off their foes. For these games at our house, I have a personal house rule that says for assault objectives, players play for 8-10 rounds instead of the 6 that the game recommends. This allows for an end in sight, but at the same time, it really gives some time to the game.

Gamer Avatar
2
My First Game Tip
6 of 6 gamers found this helpful
“The Henry Ford Approach to Squadron Building”

One of your first tasks after purchasing an FFG game is actually assembling an FFG game. After taking parts of three evenings assembling my various pre-ordered Star Wars: Armada goodies, I figured out that Henry Ford’s old production line approach was the way to assemble squadrons quickly and painlessly. Here are the steps I took, in order:

1. Open the clamshell. A sharp knife is definitely useful for this task.
2. Lay out the components, separating out the various pieces of the stands in particular.
3. Punch out the activation sliders. (Keep the squadron discs on the punchboards for now; it’ll help keep them organized.)
4. Lay out the bases in the same direction (make sure that the FFG symbol is on the same side for each, since the support peg is directional).
5. Place an activation slider in the slot on each base. (I like mine facing all the same way, but it probably doesn’t matter.)
6. Punch out a squadron disk and insert a support peg through the conveniently provided hole.
7. Carefully determine the direction of the flat side of the hole in the base, then gently insert the support peg and squadron disk assembly.
7. Choose a tree peg, then carefully load it with fighters. (The tree peg is easier to handle by itself at this stage.)
8. Finally, attach the tree peg to the assembled base, and you are ready to go.

Have fun conquering the universe!

Gamer Avatar
10
Miniature Painter
Expert Advisor
Inventor
Advanced Reviewer
10 of 11 gamers found this helpful
“Definitive Squadron Attack Range Finder”

Range 1 is an important distance for Squadrons. It is their typical attack distance and also determines if they become engaged with enemy squadrons. This particular measurement could become a frequent topic of debate.

To settle disputes in close situations, our group uses an extra prop to verify range one. An UltraPro Top Loader (a hard plastic sleeve used to protect collectible cards) happens to be exactly as wide as Range 1. Implementation is easy. In tight situations, simply have one player hold both models in question. The other player attempts to slide the card protector in between the combatants. If it can’t fit between, then you know you are at range. This method is superior to “eyeing it” since the tool automatically finds the “closest points” on the circular bases.

Gamer Avatar
10
Miniature Painter
Expert Advisor
Inventor
Advanced Reviewer
11 of 13 gamers found this helpful
“Dynamic Squadron Assembly”

Almost all the photos or videos I have seen of squadrons from this game show neatly aligned starfighters positioned perpendicularly to their stands. I admit, when I envisioned assembling my own, I expected to do the same. But then a wonderfully random accident occurred.

As I was twisting (it was painted; so a tighter fit) my X-Wing onto its stand, it started out diagonal to its frame. The light bulb went off and I immediately attached the rest of the squad in the same direction (I am recommending experimentation with different flight directions, but please keep your squadrons parallel to themselves!) The result was a more dynamic look which felt more realistic than the perfectly aligned ones.

Break out of the box and try different flight directions with your own starfighters. They will not feel as static and may even make the game feel just a bit more exciting!

Gamer Avatar
10
Miniature Painter
Expert Advisor
Inventor
Advanced Reviewer
4 of 5 gamers found this helpful
“Save Shields for Critical Moments”

The first instinct in this game is to disperse damage around the ship until all shields have been depleted and THEN begin to sustain damage cards. This is not always the best use of shields.

Your ship will not be destroyed until it has enough damage cards to match its Hull value. Facedown damage cards do not hamper a ship’s performance. Keeping these things in mind, if an attack is only inflicting non-critical damage, it is often correct to let that through. Save your shields for absorbing the assaults that include critical hits, thus preventing damage that WILL hamper performance.

Clever use of redirects and maximizing hull utility could create the edge that makes the difference in this game.

Add your own Tip, Strategy, or House Rule

You must be to add a comment.

× Visit Your Profile